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TEN AAU RESEARCHERS AMONG THE WORLD'S MOST CITED

TEN AAU RESEARCHERS AMONG THE WORLD'S MOST CITED

According to a new American analysis, ten researchers from or affiliated with Aalborg University are on the list recognising the most cited research papers among peers.

By Lea Laursen Pasgaard, AAU Communication. Translated and edited by Pernille Budde Haensel, AAU Communication.

According to a new analysis from Clairvate Analytics,  ten researchers employed at or affiliated with Aalborg University (AAU) have made it to the Highly Cited Researchers 2018 list.

Every year, Clairvate Analytics publishes a list celebrating the world’s most cited researchers for their excellent research performance measured by production of multiple highly cited papers that rank in the top 1% by citations for field and year in Web of Science.

AAU researchers on the Highly Cited Researchers 2018 list:

  • Frede Blaabjerg, professor of the Department of Energy Technology 
     
  • Josep M. Guerrero, professor of the Department of Energy Technology
     
  • Henrik Lund, professor of the Department of Planning
     
  • Brian Vad Mathiesen, professor of the Department of Planning
     
  • Petar Popovski, professor of Department of Electronic Systems
     
  • Remus Teodorescu, professor of Department of Energy Technology
     
  • Christian Torp-Pedersen, professor of the Department of Clinical Medicine
     
  • Juan C. Vasquez, professor with special responsibilities of the Department of Energy Technology


In addition:
 

  • Torben Jørgensen, honorary professor of the Department of Health Science and Technology
     
  • Gregory Y. H.  Lip, honorary doctor, distinguished professor and former honorary professor of the Department of Clinical Medicine


According to Science Report, a total of 77 Danish researchers are among the most cited researchers in the world in 2018. This is more than twice as many since the 2017 analysis, when there were 29 Danish researchers on the list.

Together with Norway and Switzerland, Denmark is among the most research-intensive countries in Europe according to the international journal of science, Nature. More information is available in the article ‘Science in Europe: by the numbers’.