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BREXIT – How it affects British AAU staff

BREXIT – How it affects British AAU staff

With the political turmoil of the past week, it is hard to ignore that Brexit is growing ever closer. Whether you are a keen follower of the daily intricate political developments or whether you are still in complete denial, you may be wondering how this whole affair is going to affect you or your British colleagues at AAU.

By Chanette Hemdrup Jakobsen, International Staff Unit
Photo: Max Pixel - Creative Commons Zero - CC0.

Following a week of no less than three votes in the British Parliament – where both the withdrawal agreement and a no-deal Brexit were rejected - the MPs voted for Prime Minister Theresa May to ask the EU for a delay to Brexit – meaning the UK may not now leave the EU on 29 March 2019 as previously planned.

However, while we may not know the outcome or even the final date of Brexit, we do know the following:

The Danish government has filed a bill setting out the rights of British citizens living in Denmark in the event of a no-deal Brexit. The bill provides for temporary continuation of the majority of rights currently enjoyed by British citizens who live in Denmark under European Union free movement rules.

This means that regardless of whether the Withdrawal Agreement enters into force or not, the Danish government has decided that residence documents that have already been issued to British citizens in Denmark in accordance with the EU free movement rules will continue to be valid for a transitional period after Brexit.

Consequently, you do not need to take any action now, if you are a British citizen and you have already once been issued with a document or card, which confirms your right of residence in Denmark under the EU rules on free movement.

However, if you are a British citizen or a family member of a British citizen residing in Denmark under the EU rules on free movement without being in possession of an EU registration certificate or card, or without having applied for one yet, you are encouraged to submit an application for such documentation before 29 March 2019. This will make it easier for you to prove that you have a right of residence, and, conversely, make it easier for the Danish authorities to determine that you are residing legally in Denmark on the withdrawal date.

Also, if you are a British citizen or a family member of a British citizen with a right of permanent residence in Denmark under the EU rules on free movement, without proof of such right (i.e. a letter or a card issued by the authorities), you are encouraged to submit an application to the State Administration before 29 March 2019, if you haven’t already done so.

It should be stressed though that your right of residence is not lost, if you have not been issued with one of the documents mentioned above. Your right of residence is not dependent on the document.

Regrettably, British citizens who move to Denmark after the Brexit withdrawal date will not enjoy the above-mentioned rights; as non-EU citizens, they will have to apply for a residence and work permit before taking up employment in Denmark.

The International Staff Unit is monitoring the Brexit situation carefully. If you have any questions regarding your, or a colleague's, situation in the event of a no-deal Brexit, please do not hesitate to contact ISU at ISU.HR@adm.aau.dk or Phone: (+45) 99 40 30 30.

For more information on how Brexit may affect British citizens in Denmark, please visit the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs website